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setting screens TIPS
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HOOPZONE
Player Development

screensA screen or "pick" as some say occurs when an offensive player attempts to blockout a defensive player away from the man he is guarding, thereby freeing up that offensive player for an open shot or pass. Setting good screens is a very important fundamental part of the game of basketball. Screens are most helpful in freeing up a teammate against a man-to-man defense, and in out-of-bounds plays, and there are times when you can screen a zone defense as well. Setting good picks are basic to most offensive plays.

Screening Drills
Screening Videos

SETTING UP SCREENS

It's your responsibility as the screener to get your cutting teammate open for the pass, dribble or shot.

Make a Big Screen
The screener should set their screen as close as possible to the defenders side. The legs of the screen should be wide with knees flexed an arms up in a huge stance. This makes your body big and allows the referee to see your hands. Too many players set screens weak, timid and small, thus getting no results. The hands are up and ready to catch the ball once the roll is made.

Proper Angle & Holding the Screen
Set the screen perpendicular to the expected path of the defender. Set the screen about a foot away from the defender with your back square to the area where the ball handler is headed. Hold the screen, be set and ready for some serious contact. Hold your ground!

Receiving The Screen (ball handlers job)
In order for this play to be a success you must drive your defender into the screen when your teammate screens for you.

Set Up the Defender
Always take your defender in a direction opposite that of your intended cut and make a "V" cut prior to using the screen.

Wait … then Go
You must give the screener time to get set and do not go too early. Once screen is set drive your defender into the screen, making shoulder contact (brushing) with the screener as you cut.

Read The Defense
If the screen has been properly set and you’ve waited, now make the decision based on your options. Is the jump shot open?  Can you drive and beat defenders to basket?  Can you pass to your screener who has rolled towards the basket?  Can your dribble and pass to a teammate?  Many options if done right.

TYPES OF SCREENS

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Screen Across

The cross Screen is used when an offensive player goes across lane to set a screen for a teammate on opposite side of floor.

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Screen Down

This screen is used when an offensive screener goes down to baseline to free an offensive cutter coming towards perimeter.

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Screen Backside

This screen is used when an offensive screener goes away from the basket to set a screen on the backside of a teammate. The teammate (cutter) breaks toward the basket. This back screen is used against defenders who are overplaying.

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Screen the Ball

This is used to create open shots inside and outside. Screening for the ball handler often creates mismatches in height or speed when defenders switch. Also see Pick and Roll.

H O O P E R X S C R E E N I N G X T I P S

 

SCREEN TO GET OPEN
A screen may be a method of helping a teammate get open, but a good screen often forces the screener´s defender to "help" and becomes one of the best ways to free yourself for a shot.

ILLEGAL SCREENS
A foul will be called for illegal screening when there is movement by the screener during the actual pick. A player must remain stationary when actual contact is made with the defender. Many times it is the dribbler who is actually at fault, because he doesn't give the screener time to set up. Always allow your man to set up before using the screen. Violation is a turnover, ball awarded to the other team.

SLIPPING THROUGH A SCREEN
If you know that the defense is going to switch on any screen, you may try to "slip the screen", meaning to set up for the screen, but right before contact you "slip" the screen by making a quick cut to the basket. Very difficult to guard, especially if the Pick-N-Roll has had prior success.

A BACKSCREEN
An off the ball screen, usually done while the defender has his back to the screener.

USING SCREENS
When using a screen, I like to set-up the defender by walking him away from the screener. Then, I try to make the defense easy to screen by bringing the defense to a stop. Try to make them turn their head by faking a move in the opposite direction, just as your teammate is setting up for the screen. Also, make sure your screener is set BEFORE you use it. You will get your big man in foul trouble and create turnovers for you team if you don't wait for your screener to be set.

SETTING A DOWN SCREEN
When setting a down screen for a player, the screener should "Head Hunt", or find the defender guarding the player that he wants to screen for. The screener should go directly to the defensive man to set the screen. The screener should then come to a stop with a wide base and knees flexed, making sure there is no movement during the actual screen or this will be called an offensive foul.

HELP AND RECOVER
There is no such thing as helping too quickly. When your teammate steers the ball into the next gap, be ready to provide quick help with your rear to the ball. When you help, you must recover on line to your man as the ball is picked up. In all screening situations you must talk, provide quick help and then recover early.

Time to get to work,

Coach O

 

Player Development Tips found on this page are what you'll be taught at HOOPZONE camps!

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This basketball site contains knowledge that I have learned from my experiences of playing, coaching, clinics and other colleagues. 
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